Category Archives: Crisis Intervention

Intervention that is provided when a crisis exists within a family to the point that usual coping methods are not helping the child or family can be referred to as crisis intervention.

Research-Based Model for Coercive Admissions

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IECA Conference Presentation: Alleviating the Perception of Coercion and Eliciting Autonomous Motivation During the Admission Process

On Friday, May 8th, 2015, our founder–Clinton J. Hardy–and Dr. Neal Christensen had the opportunity to present, Alleviating the Perception of Coercion and Eliciting Autonomous Motivation During the Admission Process, at the IECA (Independent Educational Consultants Association) Conference in Baltimore, MD. We would especially like to express our gratitude to the educational consultants and program representatives who attended […]

Also posted in Admission Process, Educational Consultants, IECA, Research, Residential Programs, Therapeutic Transport, Training, Treatment Coercion, Wilderness Programs | Leave a comment

Research Update: Recent Inquiry into Adolescents’ Perception of Negative Admission Pressures in Wilderness Therapy

Recent Inquiry into Adolescents’ Perception of Negative Admission Pressures in Wilderness Therapy In April 2014, I concluded a one-year data collection project of 76 adolescents entering a wilderness therapy program in Utah. In order to increase the access of my findings, I have included the most… Access and read full linkedin article here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140930184403-3557384-recent-inquiry-into-adolescents-perception-of-negative-admission-pressures-in-wilderness-therapy?published=t

Also posted in Admission Process, Clinton Hardy, NATSAP, News and Updates, Research, Therapeutic Transport, Treatment Coercion, Wilderness Programs | Leave a comment

A key underlying factor to an adolescent’s experience of the transport & admission process

As briefly discussed in this clip, the intentions of the parents and/or family members or rather how the adolescent perceives these intentions can impact an adolescent’s experience of the transport and admission process.  Some research has found that when individuals or adolescents believe parents and family members are making the decision for involuntary or coercive […]

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An Adolescent Transport Should Better Prepare the Adolescent/Teen for Treatment

If an Adolescent is transported into a treatment settings, such as a wilderness program, therapeutic boarding school, or residential treatment center, he/she should arrive better prepared than when the transport first commenced.  In essence, even if an adolescent and his/her parents are in conflict regarding treatment, by the time the adolescent arrives at the treatment […]

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Differentiating Adolescent Transport Approaches from false stigmas

Per the advice and assessment of a licensed and experienced mental health clinician, such as a psychologist, youth advocate, or educational consultant, an adolescent transport can facilitate a safe and therapeutically conducive context for transitioning, between the home and treatment program–e.g., wilderness program, residential treatment center, therapeutic boarding school.  If the transport staff or mediators use a […]

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Negative Pressures and Adolescent Treatment Admission Reactions

A current research study by Clinton Hardy (NST founder) is indicating that certain procedures, particularly those involving negative coercive pressures, significantly relate with adverse affective reactions, or attitudes, at the time of entering a youth/teen treatment program..

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The Assessment: Navigating the Unmarked Road

Despite popular opinion, I strongly believe that therapeutic treatment is not the most valuable resource for a struggling, wayward youth and his or her parents. It’s what happens before the treatment that truly matters—the assessment! With the amount of money poured into treatment, I would venture that far too little thought and resources go toward assessment. How are we expected to fix something if we don’t know what’s broken?

Assessments are road maps. They tell us where we’ve been, where we are, and where we should be going. More sophisticated navigation devices can also warn of detours, delays, road conditions, and areas to avoid. All of these are factors that contribute to a thorough and accurate assessment. The main thesis statement and “take away” of this blog posting is that parents will typically see a better prognosis in their child’s behavior if they invest and focus their attention on obtaining a thorough assessment (1) at the right time, (2) by the right person, and (3) with the right instrument.

Also posted in Assessment, Crisis, Educational Consultants, Matthew Barkdull, Parent Support | 10 Comments

Crisis Intervention and Teen Transportation Services

Crisis Intervention and Teen Transportation Services are readily available. However, such services are most effective after an appropriate treatment decision has been confirmed…

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Troubled Teen: Mediation Services

An outside source of mediation can often greatly reduce the trauma and risk in transitioning a troubled teen into a wilderness or residential treatment program.  If a child is treatment resistant, parents should keep in mind that it may be safer and much less anxiety for everyone to employ a professional mediation service. When searching for […]

Also posted in Troubled Teen | Leave a comment
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